Bike Reviews

2010 KTM MX range

2010 KTM MX range

Jeff Perrett gets to ride, rag n’ rate the 2010 range of Katoom two-stroke and four-stroke motocrossers…

250SX-F

Over recent years this is the bike that has brought KTM most success out on the track and it’s easy to see why. It’s fast! KTM’s first 250 four-popper had a stupidly strong motor from the outset and what they’ve managed to do is refine the motor with little tweaks every year to make it better – just like a diamond its real value is when it’s cut and polished.

And this is indeed a diamond of a motor. More than ever before it’s easy to ride and the torque is spread so far. The powerband on this bike is from when you open the throttle until you can’t twist it back any further. I reckon you could almost just put this bike in third and use it as an automatic. It starts bloody easy too and as an avid two-stroke fan that scored points for me.

The motor is a given but the suspension I’m not so sold on. For me the valving just needs a little smoothing out – arguably on all of the models – and the rear end seemed a little too hard. I think it depends on your level and many would say it’s the other way around and that the front end is too soft but either way the balance isn’t quite there.

450SX-F

There’s now some beauty in the beast! This bike has gone from wild cat to tamed tiger and is a big improvement on last year’s model. It’s a hell of a lot easier to ride and because of the now usable power and the new frame it seems lighter and more manoeuvrable.

Because the huge hard-hitting grunt has gone you can roll the power a lot more without fear of your eyes getting pushed back in their sockets while your arms get ripped from theirs. It’s the biggest improvement on any KTM MX model for as long as I can remember and to be fair it’s overdue on this bike. In one fell swoop they have brought the 450 up to speed with its little sibling the 250SX-F and given it matching street cred. However, it’s not quite all there yet and like the 250SX-F the shock and forks seem out of sync even though it does turn incredibly well.

250SX

I’m not going to bang on about how I love two-strokes and how they’re much more fun to ride and make you a better rider and all that – oh look at that, I just have! That’s always been my opinion on the 4S versus 2S debate but it all depends where you’re at with your racing.

If you want to be really competitive then the four-strokes make it easier but of course this comes at a cost. However. in the current economic climate you could do a hell of a lot worse than this bike. Like the 450 this two-stroke is still a rocket but now think of it as a Catherine Wheel and not a Screamer. Basically, it’s a very user-friendly bike now. It’s mellow, has plenty of useable torque, maybe it’s still a little bit of an animal for the club rider that might be better off on the 250 four-stroke but if you’re caught in two minds between a 250F and a 450F and can’t decide then buy this. For me – just purely because of what I want out of riding a motocross bike at all levels – this is my ideal weapon of choice in KTM’s range.

150SX

Unhappy with your partner? Then get one of these because basically it has all the attributes of a top-notch bit on the side so you can fill ya boots and have all that excitement without the guilt!

It’s nimble, exciting, sexy, dangerous, fast, fun to ride (wink, wink, nudge, nudge) and you won’t stop grinning from ear to ear. You will not stop thinking about it while it’s parked up and you’ll be dying to hook up and sneak out of work to get together. In fact, you may want to install a webcam in your workshop for those late night liaisons! I think you get the idea with this one…

It’s a pocket rocket and I’ll argue the case all day long that although it may not quite have the minerals to compete with the 250Fs it still has its place in the racing scene for young riders learning their trade who aren’t quite physically strong enough to ride a 250 two-stroke or four-stroke. Or, of course, a 30-something working on his middle age spread and edging towards a mid-life crisis!

125SX

As far as I’m concerned this is the bike that made KTM what they are today. It dominated the 125 class before the introduction of the 250F and it’s still an incredibly good bike. Where it fits in the marketplace is a tough one to figure out though and that’s a shame.

Like the 150 it has so much power for a bike of its capacity and it’s always right where you need it. The question is does it have enough to compete with the 250Fs? Er…no! The 150 is pushing your luck, racing the 125 would be racing for pride and keeping it real. However, if it’s a 125 championship such as the Fuchs-Silkolene series you’re on a winner with this one. There’s definitely enough oomph straight from the crate and it would only take a few minor refinements to have a very competitive bike.

View in Digital Vault

Specification:

125SX
Capacity: 124.8cc
Bore and stroke: 54mm x 54.5mm
Transmission: Six-speed
Fuel tank capacity: 8 litres
Front suspension: WP 48mm
Rear suspension: WP PDS
Seat height: 985mm
Wheelbase: 1471mm
Ground clearance: 390mm
Weight: 91kg

150SX
Capacity: 143.6cc
Bore and stroke: 56mm x 58.4mm
Transmission: Six-speed
Fuel tank capacity: 8 litres
Front suspension: WP 48mm
Rear suspension: WP PDS
Seat height: 985mm
Wheelbase: 1471mm
Ground clearance: 390mm
Weight: 91kg

250SX
Capacity: 249cc
Bore and stroke: 66.4mm x 72mm
Transmission: Five-speed
Fuel tank capacity: 8 litres
Front suspension: WP 48mm
Rear suspension: WP PDS
Seat height: 985mm
Wheelbase: 1475mm
Ground clearance: 385mm
Weight: 95.4kg

250SX-F
Capacity: 249cc
Bore and stroke: 76mm x 54.8mm
Transmission: Six-speed
Fuel tank capacity: 8 litres
Front suspension: WP 48mm
Rear suspension: WP PDS
Seat height: 985mm
Wheelbase: 1475mm
Ground clearance: 380mm
Weight: 98kg

450SX-F
Capacity: 449.3cc
Bore and stroke: 97mm x 60.8mm
Transmission: Five-speed
Fuel tank capacity: 8 litres
Front suspension: WP 48mm
Rear suspension: WP PDS
Seat height: 985mm
Wheelbase: 1475mm
Ground clearance: 380mm
Weight: 104.6kg